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Chinese Cresteds

 

 

 

A Little

Basic Information

 

 

The Chinese Crested dog comes in two varieties—- the Hairless and the Coated- referred to as the Powder Puff, or ‘puff’. Both may be registered and shown in conformation, obedience, agility and Jr showmanship.

The Hairless Variety was probably originally a genetic fluke, undoubtedly born of coated parents. Over centuries, man has, through selective breeding established this breed as one in which the hairlessness is consistent within litters, and is a highly desired, yet fugitive trait.

The most desired pattern of body hair on a Hairless is long hair on the head ‘ or crest’ , a ‘plume’ on 2/3 of the end of the tail, and socks on the lower part of the legs and feet, with the remaining body having soft,smooth, hairless skin.

The amount of lovely Crest and Plume

( or furnishings) each dog inherits is dependant on the type of coat his close ancestors have.... some have almost NO body hair, and very little furnishings (a truly naked dog), others have luxurious full crest and manes- these dogs also often have increased body hair- this body hair is traditionally shaved for show purposes and is part of pet grooming as well -a fact that many spectators are unaware. MANY Hairless have some amount of body hair that thins out along the spine and hips, with virtually no hair on the sides and belly. Some ‘hairless’ have a great deal of body hair requiring more grooming maintenance for the owner. THE AMOUNT OF BODY HAIR IS UNPREDICTABLE AND PART OF THE CHALLENGE AND FRUSTRATION FOR THE DEDICATED BREEDER.

The Hairless has other unique features,,,,, the gene affects not only hair, but teeth... and MOST hairless have missing, or misaligned teeth, including forward pointing canines.... called tusks. All cresteds have elongated digets ( long toes) which may be used like a prehensile climbing tool! They may also have SKIN problems, especially as youngsters, with a type of juvenile acne- (skin eruptions that they usually outgrow with maturity), which may need persistent care for a while to prevent secondary infections, including staph. Ongoing attention to the skin is necessary- just as you would care for your own skin.... black heads and white heads do occur, sunburn is a concern and Hairless may need a warm wrap in cold climates when they go outside or if the house is too cool. In most cases, care of the mature dog is merely fundamental hygiene.

   Hairless headshots showing sparse and heavier crests- Left -face is not trimmed -ears are bare. Below-face is clipped for a clean appearance.

     

Left- dog with minimal body hair- sparse crest- beautiful skin- smooth and soft.

All 3 have CORRECT placement of hair, although they vary greatly in type (look).

Sensitivity to vaccinations may occasionally appear. ASK YOUR BREEDER FOR SPECIFIC INFORMATION REGARDING FUTURE SHOTS.

A SPECIAL NOTE:

many veterinarians have never seen a Chinese Crested before- and may not be aware of some aspects of their specific health and skin care needs. Buying from an EXPERIENCED BREEDER, who offers ongoing support and information,is advisable and prudent.

 

The POWDERPUFF is essentially identical to the hairless variety in conformation, with the same general personality traits (although they are said not to be quite as ‘clingy’ as the hairless). However, notable physical differences include a fully coated body of soft, silky undercoat with long thin guard hairs creating a double coat. Coats should be straight and of moderate density and length.

Excessively heavy, kinky, or curly coats are not desired. The powderpuff also requires full dentition ( all of their teeth) and in correct alignment (they are not allowed crooked teeth like the hairless).

At one time the Powderpuff was destroyed at birth- many people thought they were undesirable. However, it is now finally understood that the powderpuff IS very much needed to breed back to the hairless variety every few generations to invigorate the hairless, helping to keep teeth in good number and alignment. The hairless gene is considered LETHAL. Breeding back to puffs on occasion, is thought to prevent the breed from literally dying out.

A very basic tour of Crested genetics brings up these facts—- breeding a puff to a hairless will produce BOTH puff AND hairless puppies. Breeding hairless to hairless... produces BOTH Hairless AND PUFF puppies!

HOWEVER—- Puff to Puff breedings are frowned upon- except in the rarest occasions (when experienced breeders are keying in on a particular trait and attempting to stabilize it) Puff TO Puff breedings produce ONLY PUFFS... and by breeding these exclusively, it is considered by mainstream breeders to be a damage to the breed , as it promotes separation of varieties.

Hairlessness is the hallmark of the breed, educated and dedicated breeders strive to preserve that which makes the Chinese Crested unique....... LACK OF HAIR!!!

     

3 Examples of Powderpuffs- Top- a ‘short coated’ puff w/haired ears (old type with sparse coat) Center- full coated puff- Clipped face and ears. d

Bottom- Full coated with hair left on face- ears clipped d

The last two are examples of modern breeding and grooming. The example on top is rarely seen in the showring and will pass the sparse coat on if bred.

A note on color— all colors are permitted on both varieties. Puffs come in a variety from White to Black and Tan- Hairless have skintones from slate to black, pink, mahogany and white and palomino— both in solid colors and with white patches— or some with heavy spotting of colors on light backgrounds. All skintones darken with sunbathing— but protect them from burning!

The Standard for the Chinese Crested calls for a dog "between 11" and 13", slightly larger or smaller dogs should be given full consideration". This would mean that a 9 " dog is just as incorrect as one that is 15". Slight may be interpreted as 1/2", and "to allow" may be interpreted as an inch. ( Measurement is height at shoulder)

Temperament is GAY and ALERT. This is an intelligent and amusing companion. Shyness and aggressive tendencies are occasionally seen and temperament IS hereditary, although some individuals may suffer from lack of early or proper training or socialization.

Dogs which deviate dramatically from the ideal standard should be neutered (never bred) but will make excellent companions!!!

This IS NOT a breed for everyone! You must be committed to the skin care needed

( especially as puppies), provide warmth and sometimes protective clothing for cold weather, and offer intellectual stimulation and training to prevent them from becoming destructive, yappy, nipping or generally obnoxious creatures. They offer an abundance of love, dedication and companionship to the worthy owner. Cresteds are REAL dogs- not just little toys to sit on the couch.

The breed has fallen into the hands of puppy millers and commercial breeders who have $$$ as a main purpose for breeding- often having multiple litters and older dogs available year ‘round. REMEMBER- YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR! Expect to pay a healthy price for a quality puppy- even pet puppies command a healthy price- — but a pet produced from well bred show stock, from breeders who strive for top quality, may be the same or lower price than one from parents of poor or lesser quality to begin with. Show breeders have no reason to perpetuate anything but the best—- nobody likes to lose at a show! A Pet Breeder may say a pup is show quality—- but if they don’t actively show- how would they know the difference????

Unfortunately genetic defects occasionally crop up- as happens with ALL breeds of dogs. It costs a great deal of MONEY to have the tests done to check dogs for inherited disorders... most commercial and back yard "hobbyist breeders never even consider a potential problems- and some show breeders also ignore potential hidden problems- dedicated breeders look for them! "I’ve never had that in my line" is NOT an excuse to avoid testing.

In an emerging breed, problems do crop up but by dealing with a devoted, educated and ethical breeder, you will have a better chance at owning a healthy specimen and of dealing with one who will back their puppies with informed skin care, grooming and training tips, and nutritional advice. Written contracts should be given with each sale to protect both parties.

And a note on contracts and "deals"—- do not buy a puppy with ‘strings" without fully understanding the ramifications of the contract. If you want a PET - expect to be required to neuter it! And don’t find yourself involved in Must Do breedings in order to fulfill a purchase contract, unless you have a sincere interest and desire to do so! If showing the dog is a requirement—- be sure you have a good understanding of the time, effort and money it may take.

Unfortunately genetic defects occasionally crop up- as happens with ALL breeds of dogs. It costs a great deal of MONEY to have the tests done to check dogs for inherited disorders... most commercial and back yard "hobbyist breeders never even consider a potential problems- and some show breeders also ignore potential hidden problems- dedicated breeders look for them! "I’ve never had that in my line" is NOT an excuse to avoid testing.

In an emerging breed, problems do crop up but by dealing with a devoted, educated and ethical breeder, you will have a better chance at owning a healthy specimen and of dealing with one who will back their puppies with informed skin care, grooming and training tips, and nutritional advice. Written contracts should be given with each sale to protect both parties.

And a note on contracts and "deals"—- do not buy a puppy with ‘strings" without fully understanding the ramifications of the contract. If you want a PET - expect to be required to neuter it! And don’t find yourself involved in Must Do breedings in order to fulfill a purchase contract, unless you have a sincere interest and desire to do so! If showing the dog is a requirement—- be sure you have a good understanding of the time, effort and money it may take.

 

 

 

These 3 puppies are from 1 LITTER!! It shows how closely the varieties of Hairless and Powderpuff are interlinked! Shown are L to R- smooth faced hairless,

an unclipped, hairy faced Hairless, and a powderpuff

with a clipped face.d

dCourtesy of Harriet Karns- used with permission

R Courtesy of Raintree

d

Additional Recommended Reading

The Official Standard of the Chinese Crested

An Illustrated Guide

and the AKC Gazette- all by the- American Kennel Club

Chinese Crested Review-Magazine

The Chinese Crested by Brenda Jones

 

There are unwanted and abused Cresteds needing re-homing for any number of reasons, from the owners death to someone simply not wanting a dog any longer. Consider adopting one of these dogs (note- puppies are rarely available). Rescue dogs are spayed or neutered prior to placement,and there is a nominal charge to cover expenses. Call for list of avail. dogs.

This pamphlet was created for any person, who has questions, interests or merely curiosity about the Chinese Crested. It is in no way intended as a guideline for judging purposes, rather meant as an overview of often asked questions with the briefest of answers, for the novice observer.

This breed is a far more complex and interesting subject than can be condensed in this short format. It was written because I cannot go anywhere with my own Crested, without a bevy of questions- and often lack of time to answer them.... this small pamphlet is easy to carry and distribute, and is hopefully informative.

No portion of this brochure may be copied

in full or in part without the written permission of the author,

Marcia Van Woert.

 

 

Raintree Chinese Cresteds

Marcia Van Woert

937-833-4247